Social Media Community Manager

Many companies are now venturing on line, using Social Media to build their employment brand and to sell more of their goods and services. Going online is not enough though. Content must be generated if a company is going to leverage from its web experience.

In the US I have noticed a role the Social Media Community Manager – now this sounds like fun! From one Job Description I found…

As a given, a Community Manager needs to be familiar with and part of:Be responsible for setting up tracking and alerts for keywords specific to our industry, subscribing to relevant industry blogs, podcasts, and video channels, and to subscribe to certain topic categories on YouTube.

Be able to comment on appropriate blogs intelligently and accurately, bringing traffic back to the company blog. Monitoring the existing blog sphere by listening and commenting would be the bulk of duties to begin with.

Already have a blog of their own so know to create an audience

Facilitate conversations inside Facebook, Ning community or other relevant communities.

Often I sign up in Facebook, or LinkedIn or some other community and nothing happens. Nada. Build it and they will come does not happen on the internet. Build it and you have to work to get their attention is more like it! It is a slow romance not a one night stand! To begin with when people sign up,  they  are on the outside looking in. It takes a while until they get the hang of it all before they get more involved.  It is new members of a group to generate content and discussion, this needs to be created by the people who set up the Group or Blog or Twitter Group – Enter the Social Media Community Manager.

This role is relatively new in New Zealand. I found a few who are working in the government sector. A few communications managers are taking this role, some people with a PR background. There are some people in the IT sector have the technical smarts to understand what is required, but they also need to be able to write and have good marketing skills. No doubt the early adopters who are already across the space should and will get these roles (although, they may cringe at the thought of this, but look at it as a career option to justify all those hours spent on the Social Net!)

So if going on line is not enough, a company needs to think about this carefully before they start. Do you have the skills and time in house to start and maintain a vibrant on-line community? Your company’s reputation is very important both off and on line. There is so much noise aound this whole area, companies are jumping into it without really thinking about it at all and wondering why then nothing happens?

Companies also need to consider are they really ready for this onlineworld? The philosophy behind online communities is openness and honesty.

Does your company want to hear what your community honestly wants to tell you?

Will you respond and be proactive to suggestions that your community suggests?

From a recruitment point of you, are you clear with your employment brand and what you messages you are communicating?

How does the Social Net fit in with the rest of your marketing?

What is the purpose of the community you are creating?

Do you know where your potential audience already goes on line?

How big do you want to be on line? Or is it better to be small with the right people?

This discussion is taking place all over the web. I like this fellows take on it.


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